"Uncle Abe" and the Rebellious Boys

Title

"Uncle Abe" and the Rebellious Boys

Subject

Lincoln, Abraham,1809-1865
Watson T. M. (Thomas Maclachlan)
Sheet music
American Civil War, (1861-1865)
Humorus songs

Description

Although only one song is presented here, the sheet music cover advertises "25 Prize Songs," including what it lists as "Uncle Abe's Rebellious Boys." The song makes fun of the secessionist states, comparing them to naughty little boys.

Creator

T. M. ( Thomas Maclachlan) Watson

Publisher

Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum

Date

1863

Contributor

H. M. Higgins

Rights

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum holds all rights and permissions.

Format

pdf

Language

en

Identifier

301117
426058633

Coverage

Chicago

Transcription

Compliments of The Authors [handwritten]

25 Prize Songs

Thou art so near and yet so far 3 1/2

Lo, Offer Thee this hand 2 1/2

Where are the Friends of my Youth...

Origin of the Harp...

Uncle Abe's Rebellious Boys...

Do they think of me at home 2 1/2

John Anderson My Jo...

Oh Charming May...

Bonnie Dun Dee...

Chicago. Published by H.M. Higgins 117 Randolph St.


Most cordially dedicated to Dr. E.G. Leach, of Boston, Mass. 3

"Uncle Abe" and the Rebellious Boys. A humorous Chant.

Poetry (?) and Music by T.M. Watson. of the Continental Vocalists.

Tenor.

When "Uncle Abe" took a four years lease of "Uncle Sam's Farm", he found a host of rebellious boys on the trees stealing apples,

Alto.

Air.

When "Uncle Abe" took a four years lease of "Uncle Sam's Farm", he found a host of rebellious boys on the trees stealing apples,

Bass.

Seeing the injury they were doing, he most respectfully requested them to come down;

Seeing the injury they were doing, he most respectfully requested them to come down;

Entered according to Act of Congress A.D. 1863 by H.M. Higgins, in the Clerks Office of the District Court of the Northern District of Illinois.


4

Upon hearing his solicitation, the saucy blockheads told him plainly they would not.

Upon hearing his solicitation, the saucy blockheads told him plainly they would not.

So without taking off his white kid gloves, he commenced throwing at them a quantity of turf and grass;

(Spoken. Woht you, said "Uncle Abe?" then I'll make you come down.)

So without taking off his white kid gloves he commenced throwing at them a quantity of turf and grass;

This only made the rebels laugh, to that that "Uncle Abe" should pretend to frighten them down with grass only.

This only made the rebels laugh, to think that "Uncle Abe" should pretend to frighten them down with grass only.

"Uncle Abe" and the rebellious boys.


5

I must try what virtue there is in stones.

(Spoken. Well! Well! confound you, said "Uncle Abe," if neither words nor grass will do;)

I must try what virtue there is in stones.

so he has taken off his white kid gloves, and is going to pelt them hertily with tones, until the rascals hasten down from the trees and beg the old man's pardon.

If mild words, and gentle means, fail to reclaim

So he has taken off his white kid gloves, and is going to pelt them hertily with stones, until the rascals hasten down from the trees and beg the old man's pardon.

If mild words, and gentle means, fail to reclaim

the wicked, They must be dealt with in a more severe manner.

the wicked, They must be dealt with in a more severe manner.

"Uncle Abe" and the rebellious boys.

Status

Complete

Percent Completed

100

Weight

20

Original Format

4
34 cm

Citation

T. M. ( Thomas Maclachlan) Watson, “"Uncle Abe" and the Rebellious Boys,” Chronicling Illinois, accessed June 17, 2019, http://alplm-cdi.com/chroniclingillinois/items/show/20072.